Emma Sage

Since the day my nana was married, at the tender age of nineteen, she has assumed and nailed the role of a “traditional housewife”. As incredible as I think she is, I thank my lucky stars that things have changed, and continue to change, when it comes to our roles as women in this day and age. I would never have cut it as a 1960’s housewife. 

Although, I am currently what you’d call a “stay-at-home-mum”. My daily tasks include keeping my kid alive, doing the washing, changing nappies, feeding the baby (and myself), managing the (baby’s) social calendar, bathing the baby, etcetera. When I get a moment to myself I write - as a freelancer and as a hobby.

I love that our roles, whether it’s around the house, socially or vocationally, don’t define us. The day-to-day activities I do (or don’t do) don’t make me any more or less of a woman. 

One of my biggest aspirations is that we drop the lady-guilt about all the things we should be doing

As a new mum I’ve been surprised, and delighted, by how I’ve managed to make the space to be creative, to dream, and even do a little of the work I love to do. Even if it’s just for a moment at a time. And to be honest, without doing these things I wouldn’t have the gumption to be the mum (or person) I aspire to be. 

I could easily feel guilty about allowing myself the time to be creative, instead of cleaning the loos while the baby sleeps - and sometimes I do. But I’m so convinced that we are inherently creative beings and we would be doing ourselves, and those around us, a disservice by neglecting this part of who we are.

One of my biggest aspirations is that we drop the lady-guilt about all the things we should be doing, and allow ourselves to make space to do the things that make us feel most alive. I believe that by doing this, we will flourish individually, as a community and as a nation. 

www.somedaysandsage.com